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LeadingAge Kansas has convened a Workforce Commission comprised of individuals and entities to help guide the work. We have approached members, academic institutions, associations, and select individuals that represent other stakeholders.

 

Commission Vision and Workforce Pillars

 

 Vision

Vision of the LeadingAge Kansas Workforce Commission is to create a competent, abundant, stable and diverse workforce to serve aging Kansans.

4 Pillars

  • Public Policy – advocating for a statutory, regulatory and reimbursement environment that fosters and supports the long-term care workforce
  • Provider Practices-creating an environment where people want to work
  • Education/Professional Development – providing best practices in talent retention, innovation, diversity and the issue as a whole
  • Public Awareness/Image – helping our members improve their image in their own communities

We understand that we cannot fix all of these problems. It will take the greater aging services community, educational entities, policy makers, funders and the society at large to make an impact. LeadingAge Kansas will serve as a funnel to decide what we can influence and begin that work through collaboration, connecting and convening individuals to make an impact.

Priorities

 

  1. Focus efforts on CNA’s and Nurses - Commission believed that these two groups are the most important for members at this time and resources be focused here.
  2. Statewide LeadingAge Kansas Employee Survey – Commission discussed the reasons why employees leave and felt that there might be more information that members aren’t able to capture in their own surveys. They requested that LeadingAge Kansas conduct a statewide survey and subsequent focus groups to provide anonymity and get to the heart of what is going on in Kansas. LeadingAge Kansas is currently trying to gain funding to conduct the survey through an outside firm.
  3. Share Best Practices – One way LeadingAge Kansas can help members is to share best practices in workforce initiatives through newsletters and educational opportunities. A workforce breakout session was held at the fall conference to discuss and share about best practices. Monthly articles under Workforce News in the Aging Update started in November to share what was learned in the breakout session. More sharing will continue to be woven into information and education throughout 2017.
  4. Advocate for Higher Pay & Reimbursement – A main priority of LeadingAge Kansas Advocacy is to increase reimbursement and higher pay for long-term care employees. It is reiterated in testimony and throughout all of our conversations with state officials. The association will continue this work and make it a higher profile need going forward.
  5. Market to Minorities – LeadingAge Kansas is currently working with the Commission on Hispanic American and Latino Affairs to bring greater awareness to that community. Marketing to this community is not the same as their Caucasian counterparts. In addition, we are working to raise awareness in their community about the need for caregivers and connect them to the appropriate learning institutions. In addition to getting minorities in the door, helping them to succeed will be important. LeadingAge Kansas will continue this work with other minority communities.
  6. Create [or Promote] a Supervisor Certification Program - The number one reason employees leave their jobs is the relationship with their direct supervisor. The Commission identified the mid-level supervisory role as critical to curving the turnover trajectory. There are many great programs available and LeadingAge Kansas is vetting them and will recommend one for members in 2017. At the moment, Nurse LEAD is a great program. It’s available online and costs around $38 per person. We recommend that all managers take the course so that the mid-levels can be supported as they learn new concepts and empowered to lead their teams.
  7. Enable More LTC Providers as Clinical Sites – The Kansas State Board of Nursing has indicated to LeadingAge Kansas that there is a critical need for clinical sites across the state for nursing students. In many cases, a clinical rotation in a nursing home is the first impression an individual has related to aging services and long-term care. LeadingAge Kansas is connecting with schools of nursing to encourage, increase communication and collaboration between providers.
  8. Advocate for Revision of the CNA Curriculum – the CNA Curriculum is old and out of date. It needs to be updated to reflect modern, evidence-based practices. LeadingAge Kansas is in discussions with KDADS Health Occupations and Credentialing regarding this issue.
  9. Wage Disparity Research - The Kansas Health Institute is conducting research commissioned by LeadingAge Kansas to identify the disparity in wages between long-term care employees and their counterparts in hospitals and other like occupations.
  10. Communication and Team Building -- LeadingAge Kansas is partnering with Washburn University to introduce the TeamSTEPPS Program for Long-Term Care to members and use it as a catalyst to improve resident safety in key areas.

Commission Members

 

Kari Bruffett, Policy Analyst, Kansas Health Institute

Adrienne Foster, Executive Director, Kansas Hispanic & Latino American Affairs Commission

Mark Garriott, ASL HR Manager, HR Partner Kansas/Oklahoma, Ascension Senior Health

Jeanne Gerstenkorn, Senior Vice President Health and Wellness, Presbyterian Manors of Mid-America

Sherry Heim, Program Manger, KHPOP

Cristal Hernandez, CNA and Staff Development Coordinator, Evergreen Community of Johnson County

April Henry, Director for Workforce Development, Kansas Board of Regents

Barb Hickert, Long-Term Care Ombudsman, LTC Ombudsman's Office

Susan Hildebrandt, Vice President of Workforce, LeadingAge National

Brenda Janda, Administrator, Good Samaritan Village of Hutchinson

Karin McCrary, COO, Village Shalom

Rachel Monger, Vice President of Government Affairs, LeadingAge Kansas

Carol Moreland, Executive Administrator, Kansas State Board of Nursing

Jeff Ritcha, Director of Nursing, Schowalter Villa

Shelby Shaw, Administrator, Pine Village

Dr. Monica Sheibmeir, Dean School of Nursing, Washburn University

Dana Weaver, Workforce Lead and COO, LeadingAge Kansas

Debra Zehr, CEO, LeadingAge Kansas